“Dunk Out” Injuries This Basketball Season

For more information, contact:
Dr. Joseph Guettler
Performance Orthopedics
248-988-8085

For Immediate Release
3/1/2014

‘Dunk-Out’ Injuries this Basketball Season
Dr. Guettler provide pointers to prevent basketball injuries

Photo: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Photo: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Royal Oak, MI—Whether participating in recreational outdoor games, playing on a school team or competing professionally, basketball is one of America’s most popular sport pastimes. With more than 28 million people of all ages taking part each year in this high-impact, extremely charged sport, the potential risk for injury is great. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) urges players to heed appropriate safety precautions and condition properly to minimize potential musculoskeletal injuries. The personal injury law firm in Miami Gardens can help with the legalities in case of complications related to injuries.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in 2011 more than 1.4 million people were treated in doctors’ offices, clinics and emergency rooms for basketball-related injuries. Among the most frequent are wrist or finger sprains and fractures, and twisting and impact injuries to the foot, ankle and knee. The personal injury attorneys from San Antonio are always ready to help when it comes to injuries.

“The majority of basketball injuries result from overuse, improper conditioning and trauma,” stated the experts from cpr in north york. “To avoid injury, it is important to stretch properly and participate in conditioning programs, such as cardiovascular training, core (abdominal area) strengthening and flexibility exercises.”

As part of the AAOS Prevent Injuries America! ® Campaign, orthopaedic surgeons would rather prevent injuries than treat them. Consider the Academy’s basketball safety tips:
Wear appropriate equipment. Shoes should fit snugly and offer support. Ankle braces can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains in patients with a history of injury (this should be discussed with your doctor or you have to check the link); protective knee and elbow pads can protect players from bruises and abrasions. Consider wearing a mouth guard. Do not wear jewelry or chew gum while playing. Other helpful equipment may include eye protection, ankle braces or sports tape. For injury and injury related claims, hire personal injury attorneys in Salt Lake City area

Ensure a safe play environment. Outdoor courts should be free of rocks, holes and other hazards. Players should avoid playing on outdoor courts that do not have appropriate lighting. Indoor courts should be clean, free of debris and have good traction. Baskets and boundary lines should not be too close to walls, bleachers, fountains or other structures. Basket goal posts, and the walls behind them, should be padded.

Maintain fitness throughout the year. Ideally, players should maintain an exercise and training regimen during the basketball season, and throughout the year.

Warm up before play. Consistent warm up and stretching exercises may reduce injuries. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling, or running or walking in place for three to five minutes. This should be followed by slow and gentle stretching, holding each stretch for 20-30 seconds. Stretches should focus on the legs, spine, and shoulders. A player should also stretch after their practices or games. Despite performing all these warm-up exercises, injuries during sports are inevitable. In such cases, whether it’s the players’ fault or the opponents’ fault, Barry Deacon Law can help with solving the issues.

Safe Return to Play. An injured player’s symptoms must be completely gone before returning to play. The player must have no pain, no swelling, full range of motion, and normal strength and should be cleared by the appropriate medical provider.

Stay hydrated. Even mild levels of dehydration can hurt athletic performance. Ideally, players should drink 24-ounces of non-caffeinated fluid two hours before exercise, and additional 8-ounces of fluid or sports drink immediately before play. While playing, break for an 8-ounce cup of water every 20 minutes.

Use proper passing and play techniques. Practice good technique. For example, when you jump for the ball, land on a bent knee rather than a straight knee. Play only your position and know where other players are on the court to reduce the chance of collisions. Do not hold, block, push, charge, or trip opponents. Use proper techniques for passing and scoring, and most importantly, don’t forget sportsmanship!

Prevent overuse injuries. Because many young athletes focus on just one sport and train year-round, doctors are seeing an increase in overuse injuries. The AAOS has partnered with STOP Sports Injuries to help educate parents, coaches, and athletes on how to prevent sports injuries. STOP Sports Injuries recommends limiting the number of teams in which your child is playing on in one season. In addition, do not let your child play one sport year round; taking regular breaks and playing other sports is essential to skill development. However, in case you get involved on speed-related collisions the best option is looking for legal advice.

Performance Orthopedics – Keeping you in the game, whatever your game may be!

Avoid Getting Sidelined This Winter

For Immediate Release
2/19/14

Avoid Getting Sidelined This Winter
Orthopaedic surgeon provides tips to prevent winter sports injuries

Bloomfield Hills, MI ⎯ At the sight of the first snowfall, kids and adults alike are eager to enjoy the variety of winter sports available. Hours of recreation are spent on activities ranging from sledding, snow skiing and tobogganing to ice hockey, ice skating and snow boarding. But according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, if the proper precautions are not taken to ensure warmth and safety, severe injuries can occur.

Winter sports injuries get a lot of attention at hospital emergency rooms, doctors’ offices and clinics. According to the U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 310,000 people were treated in hospitals, doctors’ offices and emergency rooms in 2012 for winter sports-related injuries. Specifically:
• more than 40,000 injuries were caused by sledding;
• 97,713 by snowboarding;
• 119,715, snow skiing; and,
• nearly 53,000 by ice skating.

“Countless numbers of winter sports injuries happen at the end of the day, when people overexert themselves to finish that one last run before the day’s end,” explained Dr. James Bicos, Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon with William Beaumont Hospital. “A majority of these injuries can easily be prevented if participants prepare for their sport by keeping in good physical condition, staying alert and stopping when they are tired or in pain.”

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons urges children and adults to follow the tips below for preventing winter sports injuries:

Sledding
Numerous sledding injuries are caused by collisions at the end of sledding paths and/or sledding in improper positions. Click here to read a detailed list of safety tips to help reduce these injuries.

Snowboarding and Skiing
Many snowboarding and skiing injuries can be avoided by utilizing appropriate equipment, ensuring a safe environment and following all rules of these sports. Click here to read a full list of snowboarding and skiing safety tips.

General winter sports safety tips:
• Consider participating with a partner. If possible, skiers and snowboarders should stay with a partner and within sight of each other. Also, make sure someone who is not participating is aware of your plans and probable whereabouts before heading outdoors.
• Check the weather for snow and ice conditions prior to heading outdoors. Pay attention to warnings about upcoming storms and severe drops in temperature. Make adjustments for icy conditions, deep snow powder, wet snow, and adverse weather conditions.
• Dress for the occasion. Wear several layers of light, loose and water- and wind-resistant clothing for warmth and protection. Also wear appropriate protective gear, including goggles, helmets, gloves and padding and check that all equipment, such as ski and snowboard bindings, is kept in good working order.
• Warm up thoroughly before playing and exercising. Cold muscles, tendons and ligaments are vulnerable to injury. It’s important to warm up by taking it easy on the first few runs.
• Know and abide by all rules of the sport in which you are participating. Take a lesson (or several) from a qualified instructor, especially in sports like skiing and snowboarding.
• Always carry a cell phone in case of an emergency.

Click here to read more safety tips.

More tips:
Winter sports safety

For more information, contact:
Dr. James Bicos
Performance Orthopedics
248-988-8085

American Skater Abbott takes hard fall at Olympics

US figure skater Jeremy Abbott takes a hard fall on the ice today after attempting a quadruple jump.

US Figure Skater Jerely Abbott takes a hard fall after attempting a quadruple jump today.  (Photo: Robert Deutsch USA TODAY Sports)

US Figure Skater Jerely Abbott takes a hard fall after attempting a quadruple jump today. (Photo: Robert Deutsch USA TODAY Sports)

After the fall he nearly hit the boards and lay almost motionless for 10 seconds. As he arose, he clutched his hip in pain, but continued on to finish his routine.

A quad jump is one of the most difficult jumps to complete because not only does it require the skater to leave and land on the ice with the same blade but also to complete four revolutions in the air. It has a big risk-reward ratio, but as can be seen here, the consequences of not landing it correctly can be disastrous.

From the photo, Jeremy may have suffered a multitude of injures. The most common would be a bone contusion either to the side of his hip or to his ribs. With enough of a hit to the side of the hip, you can develop an acute tendonitis that can be very debilitating. He may also have suffered an abdominal muscle pull (i.e. one of his oblique muscles).

These athletes are strong…very strong…and in order to get where Jeremy is now, this is not his first fall. More than likely, he will be very sore and badly bruised, but nothing that will keep him from competing.

You can be sure that he is getting the best care from our Olympic medical staff to get him ready for his next competition.

We wish him all the best…

Dr. Bicos
Performance Orthopedics — Keeping you in the game…Whatever your game may be…

Ski Jumping Takes Its Toll at Sochi Olympic Winter Games

So far, the Olympic Games have been more about the sports than the injuries. I don’t mind that at all — that’s the way it should be.

Last night, though, we saw two injuries during training at Ski Jumping.

Russia's Mikhail Maksimochkin lies at the bottom of the large ski jump hill after crashing while landing on Wed night during a training session.  He suffered multiple rib fractures. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Russia’s Mikhail Maksimochkin lies at the bottom of the large ski jump hill after crashing while landing on Wed night during a training session. He suffered multiple rib fractures. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Russia’a Mikhail Maksimochkin crashed on the big ski jumping hill on Wed night during a training session. He suffered multiple rib fractures and was taken to the hospital. At the same training session, Poland’s Kamil Stoch, who took gold on the normal hill, also crashed during landing and suffered an “arm injury”. He left the hill with his arm in a sling.

There are two hills in ski jumping. The normal hill, which is 90m in height, and the big hill, which is 120m in height. The ski jumper “falls” nearly 40 stories from the starting position to the landing area in about 9 seconds. The typical take off speed is 55 mph and they land at about 45 mph, all while navigating the air with nothing but themselves, their skis, and their helmet.

Rib fractures are extremely painful because they move with each breath we take. So it is very difficult to get comfortable and breath normally, let alone compete in an Olympic sport such as ski jumping. Members of the national ski jumping federation visited Maksimochkin in the hospital to discuss his injuries and his competition plan. So far there is no word on what his return to competition will be. This is where these Olympic athletes throw caution to the wind for the opportunity to compete and win a gold that comes only once every four years!

Poland’s ski jumper Stoch does plan to compete further in the event.

The finals for the big hill ski jump are being held on Saturday night. Let’s all hope for the best.

Performance Orthopedics
Keeping you in the game…Whatever your game may be.

Yes, there most definitely is.

Advil and Motrin are the same medicine. They contain ibuprofen which is an anti-inflammatory medicine. It is one of the NSAID’s. That stands for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. White Sands says that they interfere with some of the chemicals in our body that lead to inflammation (swelling and pain). They also reduce the ability for platelets to clot our blood. They are very helpful for pain from inflammation from recent or old injury, arthritis pain as well. Other examples include Alleve which is the same as Naprosyn. The active ingredient is naproxen.

Tylenol has neither of these drugs as ingredients. Tylenol is made of pure acetaminophen. This has no anti-inflammatory properties. Acetominophen is an ingredient in several over the counter and prescription medicines (primarily pain relievers). It does help reduce mild to moderate pain (such as those caused by headaches or minor surgeries), and can also lower fevers. Even though these medicines are sold over the counter without prescription, you should heed the warnings on the label. If you have any serious medical conditions or take other prescription medicines, the you should consult your doctor before taking any of these.