American Skater Abbott takes hard fall at Olympics

US figure skater Jeremy Abbott takes a hard fall on the ice today after attempting a quadruple jump.

US Figure Skater Jerely Abbott takes a hard fall after attempting a quadruple jump today.  (Photo: Robert Deutsch USA TODAY Sports)

US Figure Skater Jerely Abbott takes a hard fall after attempting a quadruple jump today. (Photo: Robert Deutsch USA TODAY Sports)

After the fall he nearly hit the boards and lay almost motionless for 10 seconds. As he arose, he clutched his hip in pain, but continued on to finish his routine.

A quad jump is one of the most difficult jumps to complete because not only does it require the skater to leave and land on the ice with the same blade but also to complete four revolutions in the air. It has a big risk-reward ratio, but as can be seen here, the consequences of not landing it correctly can be disastrous.

From the photo, Jeremy may have suffered a multitude of injures. The most common would be a bone contusion either to the side of his hip or to his ribs. With enough of a hit to the side of the hip, you can develop an acute tendonitis that can be very debilitating. He may also have suffered an abdominal muscle pull (i.e. one of his oblique muscles).

These athletes are strong…very strong…and in order to get where Jeremy is now, this is not his first fall. More than likely, he will be very sore and badly bruised, but nothing that will keep him from competing.

You can be sure that he is getting the best care from our Olympic medical staff to get him ready for his next competition.

We wish him all the best…

Dr. Bicos
Performance Orthopedics — Keeping you in the game…Whatever your game may be…

Ski Jumping Takes Its Toll at Sochi Olympic Winter Games

So far, the Olympic Games have been more about the sports than the injuries. I don’t mind that at all — that’s the way it should be.

Last night, though, we saw two injuries during training at Ski Jumping.

Russia's Mikhail Maksimochkin lies at the bottom of the large ski jump hill after crashing while landing on Wed night during a training session.  He suffered multiple rib fractures. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Russia’s Mikhail Maksimochkin lies at the bottom of the large ski jump hill after crashing while landing on Wed night during a training session. He suffered multiple rib fractures. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Russia’a Mikhail Maksimochkin crashed on the big ski jumping hill on Wed night during a training session. He suffered multiple rib fractures and was taken to the hospital. At the same training session, Poland’s Kamil Stoch, who took gold on the normal hill, also crashed during landing and suffered an “arm injury”. He left the hill with his arm in a sling.

There are two hills in ski jumping. The normal hill, which is 90m in height, and the big hill, which is 120m in height. The ski jumper “falls” nearly 40 stories from the starting position to the landing area in about 9 seconds. The typical take off speed is 55 mph and they land at about 45 mph, all while navigating the air with nothing but themselves, their skis, and their helmet.

Rib fractures are extremely painful because they move with each breath we take. So it is very difficult to get comfortable and breath normally, let alone compete in an Olympic sport such as ski jumping. Members of the national ski jumping federation visited Maksimochkin in the hospital to discuss his injuries and his competition plan. So far there is no word on what his return to competition will be. This is where these Olympic athletes throw caution to the wind for the opportunity to compete and win a gold that comes only once every four years!

Poland’s ski jumper Stoch does plan to compete further in the event.

The finals for the big hill ski jump are being held on Saturday night. Let’s all hope for the best.

Performance Orthopedics
Keeping you in the game…Whatever your game may be.

BREAKTHROUGH — Youth Pitching Injuries: Dr Guettler researches
This three-year national study of more than 750 pitchers, ages 9-18, identified several factors contributing to the problem, according to study leader Dr. Joseph Guettler, an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist with the Beaumont Health System in Royal Oak, MI.

Dr. Guettler discusses his landmark youth pitching study

Dr. Guettler discusses his landmark youth pitching study

“It became very clear that dangerous pitching behavior is occurring among pitchers as young as Little League all the way through their high school years. And, the blame doesn’t usually lie with the leagues or coaches. Most were found to be adhering to nationally recognized guidelines for pitch limits and rest. It seems much of the blame lies with behavior of parents and their kids,” Guettler said in a health system news release. It’s also known for using therapy light to increase mood and overall health.

Contrary to national guidelines limiting pitches thrown, about 13 percent of pitchers pitched competitively for more than eight months of the year, 40 percent pitched in a league without pitch counts or limits, nearly 57 percent pitched on back-to-back days, and 19 percent pitched more than one game in the same day.

The study also found that nearly one-third of pitchers pitched for more than one team during the same season, one-third played only baseball, and 10 percent also played catcher on the same team. Catcher is another position that requires a lot of throwing.

“The most prevalent reasons for arm pain and tiredness can be boiled down to five major issues,” Guettler said. “The following behaviors can lead to arm pain and tiredness which can then lead to the most significant shoulder and elbow injuries.”

These are:

    1. Pitching for more than one team during the same season.
    1. Pitching more than one game during the same day.
    1. Pitching on back-to-back days.
    1. Pitching in a league without pitch counts or playing year-round.
    Throwing curve balls before high school.

The first step in reducing the number of pitching injuries can be remembered with a simple, newly coined “Rule of Ones,” Guettler said.

It means one game a day, one day of pitching then rest, one position at a time during a pitched game, one team at a time, only one pitch before high school, and at least one season of some other organized sport. If a young pitcher says his or her arm is sore or tired, parents need to make sure the youngster takes some time off. One complaint of arm soreness or tiredness equals one week off.

Dr Bicos covering Oakland Gymnastics meet
Dr Bicos has been around the world with the USA Gymnastics team, but he also takes the time to cover the local meets.

When asked about why he does it, Dr Bicos states, “These are the kids that someday we might see up on the Olympic podium! I am proud to cover the local events and help the clubs in the area. The kids are amazing and have a fundamental drive to win.”

Dr Bicos covering the Oakland Gymnastics meet< Dr Bicos covering the Oakland Gymnastics meet[/caption]
Female Athlete Injury Prevention Program-Injury Screening at Local high schools The staff at Performance Orthopedics and members of Oakland University’s Recreation Department have initiated a program to screen female athletes in order to assess their risk for injury. They provide free injury prevention screenings for High School female athletes.

Our team of doctors, physical therapists, and athletic trainers evaluate the young athletes for any imbalances that may predispose them to injury. Based on the findings, a score is derived which places the athletes in various categories of relative risk. For those with a significant risk for injury, referrals are made to seek help to correct imbalances and thus reduce risk of injury. We can also suggest programs or products that might help the female athlete in decreasing their risk of injury. One program through Oakland University Recreational Department focuses on core strengthening and sport specific drills to reduce injury.